Storm Alert

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We are monitoring the lingering effects of Winter Storm Diego.

As of 8:30 a.m., public power communities reported approximately 300 outages.

The Emergency Assistance program continues to be prepared and ready to respond if needed. As a reminder, it is activated by members through a call for assistance to Gregg Welch or Clarice Wilson at 919-760-6027.

We will keep you updated as things develop, and as always, please don’t hesitate to reach out if we can be of any additional assistance. Meanwhile, please continue to stay safe and warm!

About ElectriCities of North Carolina

ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., is the membership organization that provides power supply and related critical services to over 90 community-owned electric systems in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia—collectively known as public power. ElectriCities manages the power supply for two power agencies in North Carolina and provides technical services to assist members in operating their electric distribution systems. ElectriCities also helps these locally owned and operated public power providers thrive today and in the future by delivering innovative services, including legislative, technical, communications, and economic development expertise.

Visit www.electricities.com to learn more about the benefits of public power and how ElectriCities helps communities keep the lights on through access to safe, reliable, and affordable energy.

Media contact
Deb Clark
Supervisor, External Communications, ElectriCities
919-760-6287
dclark@electricities.org

Helpful Links

2022 Annual Report

Our annual report includes an exclusive update and event highlights from the past year.

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The Value of Public Power

Public power providers are locally owned, locally operated, and locally controlled. They don't answer to shareholders or investors - they answer to their community.

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Understanding ElectriCities

ElectriCities is the membership organization that provides power supply and related critical services to over 90 community-owned electric systems in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, collectively known as public power.

Read More

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