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ElectriCities Celebrates Public Power and the Essential Value It Provides

ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., the membership organization that provides power supply and related critical services to over 90 community-owned electric systems in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia—collectively known as public power—joins its member communities and the more than 2,000 public power communities across the country in celebrating Public Power Week, Oct. 1-7, 2023.

“Public Power Week is an annual opportunity to shine a light on the value of public power and on the people who help provide that value,” said Roy Jones, CEO of ElectriCities. “Public power providers are not for profit, community-owned, and locally controlled, which means a better quality of life and peace of mind for public power customers.”
Public power providers are known for providing exceptionally reliable, safe, affordable, and sustainable electricity to their customers.

Exceptional reliability is a hallmark of public power. In fact, North Carolina’s public power customers experience nearly 40% fewer outages than other power providers’ customers. And when the power does go out, public power lineworkers restore power faster than other providers do.

“Public power providers in North Carolina keep the power on 99.98% of the time—that averages out to be less than one outage a year for less than an hour,” Jones said. “As critically important as that unmatched reliability is, it’s only part of the public power story.”

Because public power providers are locally owned, locally operated, and locally controlled, they answer to their local customers—not to shareholders, and they make decisions based on what’s best for their customers and their communities. Public power utilities also provide essential jobs that support their local economy.

“In public power communities, the utility’s employees—the lineworkers, customer service representatives, engineers, communicators, and other specialists—are local municipal employees,” Jones said. “As members of the community, they’re dedicated to keeping the lights on for their neighbors.”

Since public power providers are not-for-profit, if revenues do exceed expenses, those resources stay in the community and help with local needs.

A strength of public power is its broad support system. North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia public power providers are part of a mutual aid network that spans the ElectriCities membership and the country, providing invaluable support during hurricanes and other natural disasters while maintaining a superior safety record.

Public power providers share knowledge and access to resources and, together, speak in a unified voice on state and federal issues affecting public power.

“The strength of public power is the value it provides customers and communities,” Jones said. “This Public Power Week and every week, we celebrate that value and all those dedicated to powering their community’s future.”

NCMPA1 and Central Near Completion of Purchase Power Agreement on 150 MW Catawba Generation

North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1 (NCMPA1) and Central Electric Power Cooperative, Inc., (Central) are near completion of a Purchase Power Agreement enabling Central to purchase nuclear capacity and energy associated with a portion of NCMPA1’s ownership interest in the Catawba Nuclear Station.

Under the terms of the agreement, Central will receive 150 megawatts, totaling 18% of NCMPA1’s project output. The agreement diversifies NCMPA1’s energy resource portfolio and provides wholesale electric rate savings to NCMPA1’s 19 member communities. Analysis shows a 5% savings in wholesale power supply costs over the term of the contract for approximately $254 million in net present value total savings to those North Carolina communities.

“This agreement is an important step in diversifying the energy portfolio for public power communities in the western part of the state and delivers significant wholesale electric rate savings to those communities,” said Roy Jones, CEO of ElectriCities. “The 19 unanimous city and town council votes are a strong reminder of the strength and partnership of those communities working together to set up public power for success now and far into the future.”

The agreement would provide Central, a not-for-profit generation and transmission cooperative headquartered in Columbia, South Carolina, with additional nuclear capacity to serve South Carolina’s 20 distribution cooperatives.

“We are excited to secure an additional 150 megawatts of reliable, baseload carbon-free generation for South Carolina’s energy portfolio,” said Rob Hochstetler, CEO of Central Electric. “Rising demand for electricity has made it more difficult–and more important–to acquire dependable generation, particularly in the Southeast. Finalizing this deal will help South Carolina stay attractive to new industries and help keep the power on during the times we need it most. This agreement will pay dividends for years to come.”

Completion of the agreement is subject to several conditions, including unanimous consent of all 19 NCMPA1 participant city and town councils. As of Aug. 30, all 19 NCMPA1 participants voted to approve the agreement. The ElectriCities Board of Directors and the NCMPA1 Board of Commissioners approved the agreement earlier this year.

The agreement is slated to go into effect January 1, 2024, and will continue through the term of the Catawba Nuclear Station, which is currently licensed through 2043.

The Catawba Nuclear Station, which consists of two identical units, is jointly owned by NCMPA1, Duke Energy Carolinas, Piedmont Municipal Power Agency, and the North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, with NCMPA1 owning 75% of Catawba Unit 2.

NCMPA1 is made up of 19 participating cities and towns in piedmont and western North Carolina and provides wholesale power to those participants. The 19 NCMPA1 participants are Albemarle, Bostic, Cherryville, Cornelius, Drexel, Gastonia, Granite Falls, High Point, Huntersville, Landis, Lexington, Lincolnton, Maiden, Monroe, Morganton, Newton, Pineville, Shelby, and Statesville.

About Central Electric Power Cooperative, Inc.

Central Electric Power Cooperative, Inc., is a not-for-profit generation and transmission cooperative headquartered in Columbia, South Carolina. Together, Central and its 20 member cooperatives serve more than 1.6 million South Carolinians and cover more than 70% of the state’s land mass. South Carolina’s independent, member-owned electric cooperatives formed Central in 1948 in order to pool their resources to purchase wholesale power more efficiently and effectively. As explained in its mission statement, Central “exists solely for the benefit of its members” and one of Central’s most important jobs is to plan for the future power supply needs of its member cooperatives.

Media contact
Avery Wilks
VP, Communications
803-374-3115
Avery.Wilks@ecsc.org

15 North Carolina Public Power Communities Recognized for Excellence

RALEIGH, N.C. — ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., presented 15 North Carolina communities with Public Power Awards of Excellence at ElectriCities’ 2023 Annual Conference held in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The awards reflect public power’s strategic priorities, recognizing exceptional achievement in the following categories:

  • Future-focused Recognizing communities that develop a future-focused mindset
  • Strengthen Public Power Celebrating communities that build public and political support for public power
  • Provide Superior Power Highlighting communities that deliver reliable, affordable, and sustainable electric power
  • Customer-centered Innovation Celebrating public power providers that innovate and invest to better serve their customers and communities
  • People Recognizing cities and towns that leverage their people as their greatest asset

“There is tremendous value in public power, and this year’s Public Power Awards of Excellence recipients are going above and beyond to demonstrate that value and move public power’s future forward,” said ElectriCities CEO Roy Jones. “I’m honored to recognize these communities and the public power employees who put in the hard work each day to power their neighborhoods.”
This year’s award winners span the state, from Boone to New Bern and represent some of the state’s smallest and largest public power communities.

The 2022 Public Power Awards of Excellence and the winners of each category are:

The FUTURE-FOCUSED AWARD recognizes communities that develop a future-focused mindset. This year’s winners are:

  • Albemarle
  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Kinston
  • New Bern
  • New River Light & Power

The STRENGTHEN PUBLIC POWER AWARD celebrates communities that build public and political support for public power. This year’s winners are:

  • Albemarle
  • Apex
  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Granite Falls
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Hamilton
  • Kinston
  • New Bern
  • New River Light & Power
  • Rocky Mount
  • Wilson

The PROVIDE SUPERIOR POWER AWARD highlights communities that deliver reliable, affordable, and sustainable electric power. This year’s winners are:

  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Kinston
  • New Bern
  • New River Light & Power
  • Rocky Mount
  • Tarboro
  • Wilson

The CUSTOMER-CENTERED INNOVATION AWARD celebrates public power providers that innovate and invest to better serve their customers and communities. This year’s winners are:

  • Apex
  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Gastonia
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Maiden
  • New Bern
  • New River Light & Power
  • Rocky Mount
  • Wilson

The PEOPLE AWARD recognizes cities and towns that leverage their people as their greatest asset. This year’s winners are:

  • Albemarle
  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Kinston
  • Maiden
  • New Bern
  • New River Light & Power
  • Rocky Mount
  • Statesville
  • Wilson

Nearly 1.3 million people in more than 70 cities and towns across North Carolina get their electricity from public power providers. Since these public power communities own their electric system, they maintain local control and decision making over their operations, providing unbeaten reliability, local jobs, and support for their local economy.

NCMPA1 and Central Reach Purchase Power Agreement on 150 MW Catawba Generation

RALEIGH, N.C. (JUNE 8, 2023) — North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1 (NCMPA1) and Central Electric Power Cooperative, Inc. (Central) have reached a Purchase Power Agreement enabling Central to purchase nuclear capacity and energy associated with a portion of NCMPA1’s ownership interest in the Catawba Nuclear Station. The Catawba Nuclear Station, which consists of two identical units, is jointly owned by NCMPA1, Duke Energy Carolinas, Piedmont Municipal Power Agency, and the North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, with NCMPA1 owning 75% of Catawba Unit 2. Under the terms of the Purchase Power Agreement Central will receive 18 percent of NCMPA1’s project output.

NCMPA1 is made up of 19 cities and towns in piedmont and western North Carolina and provides wholesale power to its 19 participants. If completed, the agreement would diversify NCMPA1’s energy resource portfolio and provide wholesale electric rate savings to NCMPA1’s 19 member communities. The agreement would provide Central, a not-for-profit generation and transmission cooperative, with additional nuclear capacity to serve South Carolina’s 20 distribution cooperatives.

Completion of the agreement is subject to several conditions including unanimous consent of all 19 of the NCMPA1 participant city and town councils. Should all conditions be met, the sale would be effective January 1, 2024.

 

About ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc. (representing NCMPA1)

ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., is the membership organization that provides power supply and related critical services to over 90 community-owned electric systems in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia—collectively known as public power. ElectriCities manages the power supply for two power agencies in North Carolina and provides technical services to assist members in operating their electric distribution systems. ElectriCities also helps these locally owned and operated public power providers thrive today and in the future by delivering innovative services, including legislative, technical, communications, and economic development expertise.

Visit www.electricities.com to learn more about the benefits of public power and how ElectriCities helps communities keep the lights on through access to safe, reliable, and affordable energy.

Media contact
Elizabeth Kadick
VP, Communications
919-760-6285
ekadick@electricities.org

 

About Central Electric Power Cooperative, Inc.

Central Electric Power Cooperative, Inc. is a not-for-profit generation and transmission cooperative headquartered in Columbia, South Carolina. Together, Central and its 20 member cooperatives serve more than 1.6 million South Carolinians and cover more than 70% of the state’s land mass. South Carolina’s independent, member-owned electric cooperatives formed Central in 1948 in order to pool their resources to purchase wholesale power more efficiently and effectively. As explained in its mission statement, Central “exists solely for the benefit of its members” and one of Central’s most important jobs is to plan for the future power supply needs of its member cooperatives.

Media contact
Avery Wilks
VP, Communications
803-374-3115
Avery.Wilks@ecsc.org

 

 

2022 Collaborative Transmission Plan identifies 38 major transmission projects – 24 reliability projects and 14 public policy projects

RALEIGH, N.C. (APRIL 13, 2023) — Participants in the North Carolina Transmission Planning Collaborative (NCTPC) have identified 38 major transmission projects that will improve the electric transmission infrastructure as part of the 2022-2032 Collaborative Transmission Plan (“2022 Plan”). These 38 major transmission projects in the 2022 Plan represent $1.49 billion in new transmission investments during the next decade. This includes 24 reliability projects representing more than $936 million in investments and 14 additional public policy projects representing more than $554 million in investments that will enable the interconnection of new resources and replace aging infrastructure.

The major transmission projects identified in the 2022 Plan are expected to be implemented during the next 10 years by the transmission owners to enhance system reliability and resiliency, support addition of new generation resources, and potentially enable increased economic electricity transfers across the transmission network. Major projects are defined as those requiring transmission investments of more than $10 million each.

The 2022 Plan report can be viewed on the NCTPC website under the Reference Documents section at nctpc.org/nctpc/home.jsp.

The 2022 Plan includes nine new Duke Energy Carolinas (DEC) reliability projects totaling more than $255 million in new transmission investments. Appendices C and D in the 2022 Plan report contain the specific details on each of the 24 major reliability projects identified in the Plan. The in-service dates and cost estimates for some planned or underway 2022 reliability projects have been revised from the previous year’s plan report.

The 2022 Plan includes four new DEC and ten new Duke Energy Progress (DEP) public policy projects totaling more than $554 million in new transmission investments. Appendices E and F in the 2022 Plan report contain the specific details on each of these 14 public policy projects.

The NCTPC was formed in 2005 by the load-serving entities (LSEs) to ensure DEC and DEP develop a shared plan for electric transmission system enhancements located in the states of North Carolina and South Carolina. Those LSEs include DEC, DEP, ElectriCities of North Carolina, which serves public power communities across the state, and North

Carolina’s Electric Cooperatives’ generation and transmission arm, North Carolina EMC (NCEMC), which serves as the power supplier for most of the state’s electric cooperatives.

Since its inception in 2005, transmission projects totaling more than $2.919 billion have been identified in the NCTPC plans. More than $1.158 billion in projects have been placed in service through the end of 2022, $1.46 billion are still in the planning stage and another

$299 million were deferred until after 2032 or cancelled as a result of changing transmission system requirements. The plan is updated annually.

The NCTPC was established to provide participants and other stakeholders an opportunity to participate in the electric transmission planning process and develop a single coordinated transmission plan that includes reliability, resource supply additions, public policy, and local economic study transmission planning considerations. The group’s priority is to appropriately balance costs, benefits and risks associated with the use of transmission and generation resources.

Another goal of the NCTPC is to study the strength of the transmission infrastructure of DEC and DEP. The scope of the 2022 NCTPC study included a base reliability analysis for transmission needs to meet load growth between 2022 and 2032. For a variety of reasons, such as load growth, generation retirements, or power purchase agreements expiring, LSEs may wish to evaluate other resource supply options to meet future load demand. These resource supply options can be either in the form of transactions or some hypothetical generators added to meet resource adequacy requirements for this study.

In 2022, the NCTPC also examined the impacts of 14 different hypothetical transfers into, out of, and through the DEC and DEP systems under the Local Economic Planning Process. The results of these studies are documented in Section VI of the 2022 Plan report.

“The NCTPC provides a valuable function by allowing stakeholders to better understand the electric transmission planning process,” said Marty Berland of ElectriCities of North Carolina, Chairman of the NCTPC Oversight/Steering Committee (OSC). “By offering greater transparency and opportunity to provide input to the process, entities that rely on the transmission system can collaborate to develop plans for future enhancements in a manner that optimizes cost effectiveness and reliability.”

The NCTPC process includes active participation of other market participants and stakeholders through a Transmission Advisory Group (TAG), which is open to all interested parties. Stakeholders interested in joining the TAG or receiving information about the NCTPC process can sign up at nctpc.org/nctpc/home.jsp.

During the NCTPC process, an administrative consultant serves as a facilitator who chairs the TAG and solicits input from stakeholders through the open TAG meetings. Richard Wodyka, the current NCTPC consultant, can be reached at rich.wodyka@gmail.com. If you have any comments or questions on the NCTPC process or the 2022-2032 Collaborative Transmission Plan Study Report, contact Richard Wodyka via email or phone at 484-431-0335.

For media inquiries, contact the corporate media relations representatives at each entity:

Duke Energy

North Carolina’s Electric Cooperatives

ElectriCities of North Carolina (municipals)

ElectriCities Celebrates Electric Lineworker Expertise and Dedicated Service

RALEIGH, N.C. (APRIL 10, 2023) — ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., the membership organization that provides power supply and related critical services to over 90 community-owned electric systems in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, is honoring and celebrating electric lineworkers this month.

Monday, April 10, is North Carolina Lineworker Appreciation Day, and Tuesday, April 18, is National Lineworker Appreciation Day. Both days were designated to recognize lineworkers and their expertise and dedication to keeping our homes, businesses, and communities powered each day.

“These skilled men and women perform difficult and dangerous work—often in the harshest conditions—while adhering to strict safety protocols,” said Roy Jones, CEO of ElectriCities. “Whether working up high in a bucket, on the ground, or under it, lineworkers put service over self to do what needs to be done to keep the electricity flowing to the families and businesses in our communities.”

In North Carolina, public power lineworkers keep the lights on for nearly 1.3 million people in the more than 70 cities and towns across the state that own and operate their electric system. Nationwide, public power lineworkers support the one in seven Americans who live in the 2,000 cities and towns that own and operate their electric systems.

Public power lineworkers often live in the communities they serve, maintaining their locally owned and operated electric systems and quickly responding when storms or other disasters damage lines or equipment. These first responders clear the way for other first responders, bringing the first sign of recovery and hope.

Their rapid response helps get the power back on for their neighbors as quickly as possible and is key to the exceptional reliability public power providers are known for.

The average public power customer nationwide is without power for nearly half the amount of time customers of other types of utilities are, according to data from the American Public Power Association.

In North Carolina, public power customers experience 40% fewer outages than other power providers’ customers in the state. And when the power does go out, the outage lasts, on average, only about one-third the time of those other providers.

“Public power providers in North Carolina keep the power on 99.98% of the time,” said Jones. “For North Carolina public power customers, that averages out to be less than one outage a year for less than an hour.”

Along with keeping their own communities powered, public power lineworkers are part of a mutual aid network that spans the state and the country and enables public power crews to go where help is needed in the wake of disasters that damage electric systems.

To ensure they adhere to required safety procedures and protocols, lineworkers in ElectriCities member cities and towns participate in safety training, ElectriCities’ Apprenticeship Program, and other career development programs.

“Whether participating in training, providing power for their own neighborhoods, or restoring electricity for families in a storm-ravaged community thousands of miles away, public power lineworkers exhibit a well-deserved sense of pride,” said Craig Batchelor, Manager of Safety & Training at ElectriCities. “They love their jobs because they love helping others.”

“Lineworkers’ service to their communities and, when it’s needed, to communities across the state and the country is at the heart of public power,” said Jones. “I’m grateful for their unwavering commitment, and I’m proud to celebrate these hometown heroes, today and every day.”

ElectriCities Appoints New Executive Team Members

New Chief Operating Officer and Chief Strategy Officer bring decades of expertise, vision

RALEIGH, N.C. (MARCH 27, 2023) — ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., the membership organization that provides power supply and related critical services to over 90 community-owned electric systems in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, has named two new members to its executive team.

Kathy Moyer is the organization’s new Chief Operating Officer, and Andy Fusco is its Chief Strategy Officer.

As Chief Operating Officer, Kathy Moyer will oversee all of ElectriCities’ power supply and distribution operations.

Moyer has over 28 years of experience in electric utility operations. She joined ElectriCities in 2000 as an Operations Engineer and moved into the role of Manager, NCMPA1 Operations in 2011. In 2013, Moyer assumed the role of Electric Systems Manager for ElectriCities operations in Huntersville and Cornelius, North Carolina, and then later, for operations in Pineville, North Carolina. In 2016, she accepted her most recent role of Vice President, Operations.

As Chief Strategy Officer, a new position, Andy Fusco will oversee ElectriCities’ newly titled Strategy & Services Division, formerly known as Member Services. He will be accountable for strategic planning and implementing value-added member services.

Fusco has over 29 years of experience, 22 of which are in the electric industry. He joined ElectriCities in 2001 as Supervisor, Resource Planning. He was promoted to Manager, Resource Planning in 2003, Engineering & Construction Manager in 2008, and Director, Planning in 2012. In 2013, he took on his most recent position of Vice President, Member Services & Corporate Planning.

The recent organizational updates align with ElectriCities’ strategic planning efforts and follow the February announcement that Matt Schull would be stepping down as ElectriCities COO to join Missouri River Energy Services as its president and CEO.

“We’re committed to ensuring that ElectriCities is well positioned to meet our members’ needs now and in the future,” said ElectriCities CEO Roy Jones. “I’m confident that Kathy’s and Andy’s expertise and vision will enable us to continue to move public power forward.”

Media contact
Elizabeth Kadick
VP, Communications, ElectriCities
(919) 760-6285
ekadick@electricities.org

ElectriCities Joins Nation in Celebrating the Value of Public Power

RALEIGH, N.C. (September 28, 2022) — ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides support and services to public power communities in North Carolina and beyond, joins more than 70 public power communities in North Carolina and more than 2,000 across the country in celebrating Public Power Week, Oct. 2-8, 2022.

Public power communities are cities and towns that own and operate their electric systems. Public Power Week is an annual opportunity to shine a light on the value those municipally owned utilities provide their customers and their communities.

“Public power is a crucial component in cities and towns across North Carolina,” said Roy Jones, CEO of ElectriCities. “Public power providers drive overall community health by delivering unmatched electric reliability, affordable and sustainable power, excellent local service, and essential jobs in these communities.”

Unmatched reliability

Public power is known for providing its customers with exceptional reliability. In fact, North Carolina public power providers deliver safe, affordable, and sustainable electricity with a reliability rating of 99.98%—more reliable than other power providers in the state.

North Carolina’s public power customers experience 40% fewer outages than other power providers’ customers. And when the power does go out, public power lineworkers restore power faster than other providers do.

The American Public Power Association (APPA), a national trade association, has recognized 26 public power communities in North Carolina as Reliable Public Power Providers for providing outstanding reliability, safety, workforce development, and system improvement—more utilities than in any other state.

Locally powered for local good

Because public power providers are locally owned, locally operated, and locally controlled, they answer to their local customers—not to shareholders, and they make decisions based on what’s best for their customers and their communities. Public power utilities also provide essential jobs that support their local economy.

In public power communities, the utility’s employees—the lineworkers, customer service representatives, engineers, and other specialists—are local municipal employees. As members of the community, they are dedicated to keeping the lights on for their neighbors.

Since public power providers are not-for-profit, any funds generated by residents paying their power bills go back into the community.

“The strength of public power is the value it provides its customers and communities,” said Jones. “Public power providers are essential community assets and dependable institutions that provide excellent service, valuable energy solutions, and a commitment to community.”

Strong support system

North Carolina public power communities are part of a mutual aid network that spans the state and country, providing invaluable support during hurricanes and other natural disasters while maintaining a superior safety record.

“That network of public power communities provides a broad support system,” Jones said. “It enables public power providers to share knowledge and access resources that help leverage growth opportunities, locate needed equipment, and ensure the superior service public power is known for. It also provides a unified voice on state and federal issues affecting public power.”

Rich history and bright future in North Carolina

Many of North Carolina’s public power cities and towns have been providing electricity to their communities for more than 100 years. Along the way, they’ve adapted to changes in technology, how power is generated, the demand for electricity, and more to keep public power communities strong.

Jones said technological advances, the demand for clean energy, and evolving customer expectations continue to drive change in the energy industry—and will for years to come.

“Being community-owned puts public power providers in a good position to take advantage of the opportunities for innovation that come with industry growth and evolution,” he said. “They get to decide how to invest in and power their future based on what’s best for their communities and their customers.”

“The future is bright for these public power providers and their customers who benefit every day from a better quality of life,” Jones said. “For all the value it provides, I’m thrilled to celebrate public power during Public Power Week and every day of the year.”

Learn more about the value of public power at www.electricities.com/benefits.

Media contact
Elizabeth Kadick
Manager, Communications, ElectriCities
(919) 760-6285
ekadick@electricities.org

ElectriCities Celebrates Electric Lineworkers’ Value, Commitment, and Service

RALEIGH, N.C. (April 8, 2022) — ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., along with public power providers across the state and the country, is honoring and celebrating electric lineworkers this month.

Monday, April 11, is North Carolina Lineworker Appreciation Day, and Monday, April 18, is National Lineworker Appreciation Day. Both days were designated to recognize lineworkers and their contributions to protect public safety, keeping electricity flowing to homes and businesses.

“Day or night, rain or shine, lineworkers rise to the occasion and put the needs of their neighbors and community above their own,” said Roy Jones, CEO of ElectriCities. “They perform difficult work that requires a high level of skill and expertise, and they often do that work in grueling and dangerous conditions for long hours—all while adhering to strict safety protocols.”

In North Carolina, public power lineworkers keep the lights on for nearly 1.3 million people in the more than 70 cities and towns across the state that own and operate their electric system. Nationwide, public power lineworkers support 2,000 cities and towns—more than 49 million people.

Public power lineworkers often live in the cities and towns they serve, maintaining their locally owned and operated electric systems and quickly responding when storms or other disasters damage lines or equipment. These neighbors serving neighbors are key to the exceptional reliability public power providers are known for.

According to data reported to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the average public power customer nationwide is without power for less than half the amount of time customers of other types of utilities are. North Carolina’s public power customers fare even better. They experience 40% fewer outages than other power providers’ customers in the state. And when the power does go out, the outage lasts, on average, only about one-third the time of those other providers.

Along with keeping their own communities powered, public power lineworkers are part of a mutual aid network that spans the state and the country and enables public power crews to go where help is needed in the wake of disasters that damage electric systems.

“Lineworkers from our member communities never hesitate to answer the call and go where help is needed,” said Gregg Welch, Manager of Programs & Services at ElectriCities and a coordinator of the organization’s Emergency Assistance Program. “That may mean working a few hours or days to help a nearby municipality repair storm damage or, most recently, working a few weeks to help rebuild a hurricane-ravaged system in Houma, Louisiana, or to help build a system that lights up a Navajo reservation for the first time.”

“There’s no doubt, lineworkers power our lives,” said Jones. “Their service to their communities and, when it’s needed, to communities across the state and the country is the backbone of public power. I’m proud to celebrate these hometown heroes, today and every day.”

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18 North Carolina Public Power Communities Recognized for Excellence

RALEIGH, N.C. (March 29, 2022) — ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc., has presented 18 North Carolina communities with Public Power Awards of Excellence. The awards align with ElectriCities’ five strategic priorities, recognizing exceptional performance in:

  • Communicating the value of public power
  • Continuous improvement
  • Grid modernization
  • Wholesale power cost
  • Workforce planning and development

“The commitment and dedication North Carolina’s public power providers demonstrate to their communities is always impressive,” said ElectriCities CEO Roy Jones. “I’m proud of these award winners for continuing to find ways to deliver better service and more value to the communities they serve while meeting the challenges of the past few years head-on.”

This year’s award winners span the state, from Morganton to Greenville, and represent some of the state’s smallest and largest public power communities.

The 2021 Public Power Awards of Excellence and the winners of each are:

The VALUE OF PUBLIC POWER AWARD highlights communities that communicate the value of municipal electric system ownership to key stakeholders. This year’s winners are:

  • Dallas
  • Fayetteville Public Works Commission (PWC)
  • Granite Falls
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Kinston
  • Lexington
  • Maiden
  • New River Light & Power
  • Rocky Mount
  • Statesville
  • Wilson

The CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT AWARD recognizes cities and towns that constantly review and enhance all aspects of public power while focusing on cost reduction and increased efficiencies in current and future operations. This year’s winners are:

  • Apex
  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Granite Falls
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Kinston
  • Maiden
  • Morganton
  • New River Light & Power
  • Rocky Mount
  • Statesville
  • Wilson

The GRID MODERNIZATION AWARD focuses on promoting investment in public power communities’ electric distribution systems and in technology to ensure safety and reliability and to exceed customer expectations. This year’s winners are:

  • Clayton
  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Laurinburg
  • Morganton
  • New River Light & Power
  • Statesville
  • Wilson

The WHOLESALE POWER COST AWARD recognizes communities that provide competitive and stable wholesale electric rates that meet the power supply need of Power Agency members. This year’s winners are:

  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Gastonia
  • Granite Falls
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Kinston
  • Lexington
  • New River Light & Power
  • Rocky Mount
  • Statesville
  • Tarboro
  • Wilson

The WORKFORCE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT AWARD honors communities that promote a workforce plan to attract, develop, and retain the necessary talent to provide safe, reliable power and to lead public power forward. This year’s winners are:

  • Albemarle
  • Dallas
  • Fayetteville PWC
  • Gastonia
  • Granite Falls
  • Greenville Utilities Commission
  • Kinston
  • Lexington
  • Maiden
  • New River Light & Power
  • Rocky Mount
  • Statesville
  • Tarboro
  • Wilson

Nearly 1.3 million people in more than 70 cities and towns across North Carolina get their electricity from public power providers. Since these public power communities own their electric system, they maintain local control and decision making over their operations, providing unbeaten reliability, local jobs, and support for their local economy.

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